Dr. Juliana Dresvina

Fellow

juliana.dresvina@greenes.institute

01865 664408

Dr Juliana (Julie) Dresvina was educated at Moscow State University (History), Balliol College, Oxford (Theology), and Magdalen College, Cambridge (English), with brief forays into the German and Chinese academes, as well as certificates in psychology from Psychology Academy of Ireland and University of Roehampton. She has taught at the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, QMUL, KCL, Reding, and Winchester, and held additional research positions in the Paul Mellon Centre for British Art and Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, Paris. She is also the Executive Assistant for the Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature.

Her research interests include expressions of late-medieval piety, which reaches out into the fields of medical humanities, “neuromedievalism”, medieval manuscript production and circulation, and material culture, mainly focusing on England but extending into the Celtic areas and the Continent all the way into Russia, with secondary research interest being creative activities of the Oxford academics and their associates in the first half of the 20th century. Her major publications include a new edition and the first ever translation into Russian of Julian of Norwich’s “Showings” (Moscow, 2010) and a monograph, A Maid with a Dragon: The Cult of St Margaret of Antioch in Medieval England (800-1500) (Oxford University Press, British Academy Monograph series, 2016). Her second monograph, forthcoming with Brill in 2020, explores late-medieval life-writing and approach ‘unusual’ religious experiences through the combination of literary criticism and psychology/neuroscience. Dr Dresvina has also edited, jointly with Dr Victoria Blud (University of York), a volume Cognitive Sciences and Medieval Studies: An Introduction, which will appear with University of Wales Press in early 2020. Finally, she is the editor of the collection Thanks for Typing: Remembering Forgotten Women in History for Bloomsbury, also to appear in print in 2020.

Fellow

juliana.dresvina@greenes.institute

01865 664408

Dr Juliana (Julie) Dresvina was educated at Moscow State University (History), Balliol College, Oxford (Theology), and Magdalen College, Cambridge (English), with brief forays into the German and Chinese academes, as well as certificates in psychology from Psychology Academy of Ireland and University of Roehampton. She has taught at the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, QMUL, KCL, Reding, and Winchester, and held additional research positions in the Paul Mellon Centre for British Art and Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, Paris. She is also the Executive Assistant for the Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature.

Her research interests include expressions of late-medieval piety, which reaches out into the fields of medical humanities, “neuromedievalism”, medieval manuscript production and circulation, and material culture, mainly focusing on England but extending into the Celtic areas and the Continent all the way into Russia, with secondary research interest being creative activities of the Oxford academics and their associates in the first half of the 20th century. Her major publications include a new edition and the first ever translation into Russian of Julian of Norwich’s “Showings” (Moscow, 2010) and a monograph, A Maid with a Dragon: The Cult of St Margaret of Antioch in Medieval England (800-1500) (Oxford University Press, British Academy Monograph series, 2016). Her second monograph, forthcoming with Brill in 2020, explores late-medieval life-writing and approach ‘unusual’ religious experiences through the combination of literary criticism and psychology/neuroscience. Dr Dresvina has also edited, jointly with Dr Victoria Blud (University of York), a volume Cognitive Sciences and Medieval Studies: An Introduction, which will appear with University of Wales Press in early 2020. Finally, she is the editor of the collection Thanks for Typing: Remembering Forgotten Women in History for Bloomsbury, also to appear in print in 2020.